Wyalusing High School

ACE courses offered 2020-2021

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Vocabulary and concepts of accounting and bookkeeping for the small business. Provides some knowledge of accounting for working in a business environment and some skills to do the accounting in a small business organization. (4 cr. hrs.) Cannot be taken for credit if credit has already been earned for ACCT 1030.
Presents an introduction to Anatomy and Physiology including body organization, biochemistry, cells, genetics, integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Laboratory includes the dis- section of preserved mammal organs. This course is designed for nurses, physical education students and assistant level health care fields. This course is not recommended for science majors. (4 cr. hrs.) (Fall, Summer). Prerequisites: high school biology and chemistry with a grade of 75% or higher or college biology and chemistry. Eligible to take ENGL 1010 and placement into college level math. Lecture/laboratory. Lab fee.
Presents an introduction to Anatomy and Physiology including the endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. Laboratory includes the dissection of preserved mammal organs and fetal pig. This course is designed for nurses, physical education students and assistant level health care fields. This course is not recommended for science majors. (4 cr. hrs.) (Spring, Summer). Prerequisites: BIOL 1210. Lecture/laboratory. Lab fee.
Emphasizes the modern aspects of biology and its techniques. Includes biochemistry, cell structure and physiology, genetic mechanisms, a survey of the three domains of organisms, and plant structure and physiology. For math/science students (4 cr. hrs.) Lecture/laboratory. Meets General Education requirement in Natural Sciences. Maximum of 18 total students in a single LAB section. If more than 18 students are in the course, they must be broken up into at least 2 sections.
Emphasizes the modern aspects of biology and its techniques. Includes evolution, animal diversity, human and animal anatomy/physiology, animal behavior, reproduction and development, and ecology. For math/science students. Laboratory involves dissection of a preserved fetal pig and various vertebrate organs, as well as the use of living invertebrates. (4 cr. hrs.) Lecture/laboratory. Meets General Education requirement in Natural Sciences. Maximum of 18 total students in a single LAB section. If more than 18 students are in the course, they must be broken up into at least 2 sections.
Principles of chemistry and its quantitative aspects. Stoichiometry, characteristics of matter, structure and bonding, elementary thermochemistry, solutions, equilibrium, thermodynamics and electrochemistry. Descriptive chemistry is integrated throughout the course. (4 cr. hrs) Lecture/laboratory. Meets General Education requirement in Natural Sciences. Intended for, but not limited to, math/science students. It is recommended that students be familiar with algebraic and logarithmic calculations; high school physics is strongly suggested Maximum of 18 total students in a single LAB section. If more than 18 students are in the course, they must be broken up into at least 2 sections.
Principles of chemistry and its quantitative aspects. Stoichiometry, characteristics of matter, structure and bonding, elementary thermochemistry, solutions, equilibrium, thermodynamics and electrochemistry. Descriptive chemistry is integrated throughout the course.(4 cr. hrs.) Lecture/laboratory. Meets General Education requirement in Natural Sciences Intended for, but not limited to, math/science students. It is recommended that students be familiar with algebraic and logarithmic calculations; high school physics is strongly suggested Maximum of 18 total students in a single LAB section. If more than 18 students are in the course, they must be broken up into at least 2 sections.
Theories and applications of computers. Includes computer architecture, hardware, software, number coding, problem solving paradigms, microcomputer applications, network technology, computer ethics, computer careers, e-commerce, and system software. (4 cr. hrs.) Lecture/laboratory; Recommended for computer majors only; non-majors see CSIT 1390. Shelf Life Alert.
Essay writing designed to sharpen the student's perceptions of the world through the study and use of non-fiction writings and to facilitate communications with correctness, clarity, unity, organization, and depth. Assignments include expository writing, argumentation, and research techniques.(3 cr. hrs.) Meets General Education requirement in Basic Communication.
Essay writing course designed to advance critical, analytical, and writing abilities begun in ENGL 1010. Literary analysis and interpretation on works of fiction, poetry, and drama.(3 cr. hrs.) Meets General Education requirement in Humanities and Basic Communication.
Surveys the foundations of the major cultures of today’s world from the beginning of recorded history to the early modern age, with an emphasis on how these developments continue to shape the human experience. Students will utilize methods of the social sciences by researching, interpreting, and communicating an understanding of primary and secondary historical sources. This world history course studies human patterns of interaction with a particular focus on change over time, global exchange, and those phenomena that connect people, places and ideas across regional boundaries. (3 Cr. hrs.)
Surveys the cultural changes and continuities of selected world societies during the early modern and modern eras, from the sixteenth century CE to the present. Students will utilize methods of the social sciences by researching, interpreting, and communicating an understanding of primary and secondary historical sources. This world history course studies human patterns of interaction with a particular focus on change over time, global exchange, and those phenomena that connect people, places and ideas across regional boundaries, with an emphasis on the shaping of the modern age and the implications for the future of the global community. (3 cr. hrs.) (ASN). Prerequisite: Eligible to take ENGL 1010. Writing in content area.
Dreams and concepts brought to the New World and their development into America’s institutions and social fabric. Conflict and consensus among groups, dilemmas facing revolutionaries and reformers, and ways economic, political and social changes have occurred. (3 cr. hrs.) Meets General Education requirement in American History.
End of the Civil War to the present. Topics include: industrial-urbanization, racism, sexism, the new manifest destiny, political changes, and the growth of a modern nation. (3 cr. hrs.) Meets General Education requirement in American History.
Surveys the period of European history extending from late Roman Antiquity to the early Renaissance. Emphasizes the use of primary sources. Explores the tension within medieval civilization between tradition and change, order and disorder. (3 cr. hrs.) (ASN). Prerequisite: Eligible to take ENGL 1010. Writing in content area. Upper-level course.
The history of Europe since 1815, beginning with reactionism after the “excesses” of the French Revolution and Napoleon and covering the European alliances and the wars of the 20th century. (3 cr. hrs.) (ASN). Prerequisite: Eligible to take ENGL 1010. Upper-level course.
An intuitive approach to statistics. Analysis and description of numerical data using frequency distributions, histograms and measures of central tendency and dispersion, elementary theory of probability with applications of binomial and normal probability distributions, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, chi-square, linear regression, and correlation. The statistical computer language Minitab will be used. (4 cr. hrs.) Graphing calculator required; Texas Instruments TI-83 or TI-84 recommended.
Semester includes definitions and axioms of the number systems, inequalities, absolute value, graphical analyses of polynomial, rational functions, and systems of equations. (3 cr. hrs.) (Fall, Spring). Prerequisite: MATH 1225 or MATH 1240, or placement. Cannot take both MATH 1411-1412 and MATH 1413 for credit. A graphing calculator without a CAS (Computer Algebra System) is required; Texas Instruments TI-83 or TI-84 recommended. Meets SUNY General Education requirement in Mathematics.
The second semester of a two semester sequence to prepare students to take Calculus. The course thoroughly studies trigonometric functions of real numbers, including their graphs, and trig identities and applications of trigonometry. Analytical geometry is covered and an introduction to polar coordinates. Mathematical induction and the binomial theorem are also introduced. (3 cr. hrs.) (Spring).Prerequisite: MATH 1411 or placement. Cannot take both MATH 1411-1412 and MATH 1413 for credit. A graphing calculator without a CAS (Computer Algebra System) is required; Texas Instruments TI-83 or TI-84 recommended. Meets SUNY General Education requirements in Mathematics.
The first semester of differential and integral single variable calculus. Basic theory using algebraic and trigonometric function and applications are covered concurrently. Topics include limits, derivatives, considered by algebraically and graphically, differentials and their use as approximations, the indefinite and definite integrals with applications to areas, volumes, surface area, arc length, moments and center of mass. (4 cr. hrs.) Graphing calculator required; Texas Instruments TI-83 or TI-84 recommended. Cannot receive credit for this course and MATH 1510-1520. Meets SUNY General Education requirement in Mathematics.
Introductory principles of classical and modern physics. Mechanics of solids, periodic motion and sound, and heat and properties of matter. (4 cr. hrs.) Lecture/laboratory. Meets General Education requirement in Natural Sciences. A transfer course for students majoring in biology, chemistry, mathematics, or health sciences. Students wishing to major in physics may take this course but should transfer to PHYS 1820, 2830 and 2840 sequence after one semester. Maximum of 18 total students in a single LAB section. If more than 18 students are in the course, they must be broken up into at least 2 sections.