Academic Policies and Procedures

These policies and procedures will guide and benefit you as you proceed through your studies.

If you are confused by any of these policies and procedures, consult Advising & Counseling Services, or an advisor or a counselor who can give you the correct interpretation. In matters where an educational judgment is necessary, Advising & Counseling Services or the appropriate associate dean can provide clarification. If you should disagree with the interpretation which you receive, the final source of appeal is the Vice President and Dean of Academic Affairs. Please ask questions about any policy which concerns you.

Academic Appeals

Any student has the right to appeal to the Academic Standards Committee for an exception to academic policies and procedures. The appeal process is readily available and each appeal is given careful individual consideration. The written appeal should clearly state the desired action and the reasons for the request. All appeals are submitted to Advising & Counseling Services and are evaluated by the Academic Standards Committee with a recommendation passed to the Faculty Assembly. Academic advisors or counselors are willing to assist in preparing an appeal.

Academic Progress Policy (Effective Spring 2010 semester)

Standards of Academic Progress Corning Community College requires students to maintain a standard of progress to keep matriculation in a degree program and eligibility for financial aid. Good academic standing is important to all students. In order to be in good academic standing and to be making progress toward a degree or certificate, students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and successfully complete 60% percent of their attempted credit/credit equivalent hours each semester. At least once each semester, students are encouraged to meet with their faculty advisor or with a counselor in Advising & Counseling Services to review their academic progress.

Matriculated CCC students (full-time and part-time) will be evaluated at the end of each semester of attendance, except summer and winter, on the following criteria and must meet both the GPA and passed hours requirements to remain in good academic standing. If the standard of progress is not achieved, a student will be placed on academic probation or academic suspension as indicated in the chart below.

Students should be aware that grades of A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, D, F, and, I, N, P, W, R, S, U, and X count as “hours attempted,” under the Academic Progress Policy. Passed hours include grades of A through D, and P.

How Academic Standing is Determined

GPA Requirements:

Students' GPA will be used to determine their academic progress status based on total hours attempted as follows (for students granted Fresh Start, the Fresh Start GPA will be used to determine academic status):

CGPA

0-1.40

1.41-1.60

1.61-1.99

2.0+

Total HA 0.50-32.5

Probation

Probation

Probation

Good Standing*

Total HA 33-48.5

Suspension

Probation Probation Good Standing*

Total HA 49+

Suspension Suspension Probation Good Standing*

* Passed Hours Requirement

Students meeting the GPA requirement for “Good Standing” must also pass 60% of hours attempted in the semester being evaluated. Students who do not pass 60% of hours attempted, in the semester being evaluated, will be placed on probation regardless of GPA.

Probation: Academic probation serves as warning that a student is in academic jeopardy. Students may be placed on academic probation either by their GPA, according to the above chart or by not passing 60% of their attempted hours within a semester. Students placed on academic probation must meet with their faculty advisor or with a counselor in Advising & Counseling Services to discuss the re­quirements for good academic standing, to register for courses, and to create an academic success plan. A student placed on academic probation will be limited to 13 credit hours for the subsequent semester unless an Academic Progress Appeal is submitted to and approved by the Academic Standards Committee (see Academic Appeal Process below).

Suspension: A student will be placed on academic suspension when their GPA fails to meet the requirements of the above chart based on the total number of hours he or she has attempted. Academic suspension means that the student is no longer in a degree program, loses all financial aid, and is not eligible to return to CCC for one full academic semester. If the student had pre-registered for courses, his or her schedule will be deleted. A student placed on academic suspension at the conclusion of the fall semester may not enroll in the subsequent winter session or spring semester. Likewise, a student placed on academic suspension at the conclusion of the spring semester may not enroll in the subsequent summer session or fall semester. A student will remain on academic suspension until an Academic Progress Appeal has been submitted and reviewed by the Academic Standards Committee (see Reinstatement below).

Academic Appeal Process: Students who are seeking a change in status and/or credit limit need to complete and submit an Academic Progress Appeal. As part of the appeal process, students must submit a plan for academic success that identifies the causes of their poor academic performance and demonstrate that actions have been taken to avoid or eliminate these causes. To begin the appeal process, a student must meet with his or her faculty advisor or a counselor in Advising & Counseling Services to create a plan for academic success and to complete the Academic Progress Appeal. The Academic Progress Appeal is then submitted to the Academic Standards Committee for review. Academic Progress Appeals are available in Advising & Counseling Services.

Reinstatement: A student who has been placed on academic suspension may appeal this action if extenuating circumstances

have led to the lack of progress toward a degree/certificate. As part of the appeal process, students must submit a plan for academic success that identifies the causes of their poor academic performance and demonstrate that they have taken actions to avoid or eliminate these causes. To begin the appeal process a student must meet with their faculty advisor or a counselor in Advising & Counseling Services to create a plan for academic success and to complete the Academic Progress Appeal. The Academic Progress Appeal is then submitted to the Academic Standards Committee for review. Academic Progress Appeals are available in Advising & Counseling Services.

When an appeal is granted, the student will be reinstated with probationary status and be required to meet the conditions specified by the Academic Standards Committee, including, but not limited to, completing a specific course(s), limiting the number of credit hours for which the student may register, achieving a semester grade point of average of 2.0, and successfully completing all coursework. Once reinstated, a student will be reevaluated at the conclusion of the semester in accordance with the Standards of Academic Progress, as noted above. Moreover, if a re-instated student earns a semester GPA of 2.0 or higher and has completed at least 60% of the hours attempted in that semester and still falls in suspension status, the student will continue with probationary status.

Readmission for Students with Load Hour Limits: Following a period of one or more semesters of non-attendance at CCC, students must re-apply to the College through the Admissions office. Any prior academic status and credit limit is still in place. Students who wish a change in status must complete and submit a Readmit Appeal to the Academic Standards Committee. If the Appeal is approved, the student will be enrolled in probationary status and required to meet the conditions specified by the Academic Standards Committee.

If two or more years have elapsed since last attendance, students will be readmitted in good standing with no credit limit. However,

subsequent academic progress will be reviewed in accordance with the policy, unless a student has earned a 2.0 or higher semester GPA and completed at least 60% of the hours attempted in the semester of the student’s return.

Adding Courses
See Drop/Add.

Advanced Standing

Advanced standing may be granted to transfer students from other colleges or post-secondary schools, applicants with credit for life experiences and those who have shown proficiency in specific subject areas through standardized examination programs. When considering students for advanced standing, with or without credit, the College is guided by the recommendations of the American Council on Education and the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers and reserves the right to evaluate all academic work in terms of current validity. The learning experience must be at the college level and appropriate to the student’s program. Degree candidates must complete a minimum of 30 program hours of credit in residence at CCC.

There are several methods by which credit is granted:

Credit bearing transfer courses (at C level or above) may be accepted from any regionally accredited, candidate, or correspondent institution of higher education or NYS Education Department chartered degree granting institution. There shall be no limit on the number of transfer credits accepted. An applicant who has attended other colleges or post-secondary schools and wishes to receive transfer credit for work completed must provide the Admissions Office with an official transcript from each school.

Credit by examination may be awarded to students who earn an appropriate grade in any of the following exams: CCC challenge exams, Excelsior College exams, Advanced Placement exams offered through the College Board, International Baccalaureate Exams, College Level Examination Program (CLEP) and DANTES exams. CCC is a test site for CLEP and DANTES. In some cases, CCC course work or other demonstration of skills may be required before credit is granted. Contact the Admissions Office or Continuing Education for information.

Credit for military or other training programs may be earned through any of the following means: military coursework, non-collegiate institution sponsored courses/workshops as recommended for credit by the American Council on Education, coursework approved by the New York State Education Department or a CCC associate dean and CCC approved training programs offered through industry.

Credit through portfolio assessment is granted by an academic division. Persons who have gained college-level learning through work or other experiences may demonstrate that knowledge through various methods (performance, oral or written). These credits are not considered CCC residency credits but are treated as transfer credit. A maximum of 20 credits can be received.

There is a fee for credits awarded. Contact Continuing Education for more information.

Animal Use Policy

Some majors-level courses and programs, within the Health & Sciences Division, require vertebrate dissection and/or the use of living animals. Unless required by a specific program, participation in dissection in non-majors courses, within the Health & Sciences Division, is not mandatory. Alternatives to dissection may be provided where necessary. Please see individual catalog descriptions for courses that may require participation in this activity.

Appeals Protocol to the Policy:

Objections to this policy will first be brought, in writing, to the Biology/Chemistry Department Chairperson for discussion and a decision.

If this decision is not satisfactory, the individual may refer the objection, in writing within 5 days, to the Associate Dean of the Health & Sciences Division for a decision.

If this decision is not satisfactory, the individual may refer the objection, in writing within five days, to a committee comprised of the Vice President and Dean of Academic Affairs, one faculty member from the Biology/Chemistry Department (other than the one teaching the course in question), and one associate dean (other than the Associate Dean of the Health & Sciences Division). The decision of this committee is final.

Attendance

Success in courses is directly related to attendance. Regular attendance in class and laboratory sessions is expected of all students; however, instructors determine student attendance requirements for their courses. These attendance requirements, along with their relationships to final grades; should be clearly stated in the course syllabus. Attendance also affects eligibility for financial aid and it is important that students attend classes on a regular basis to avoid loss of financial aid. Students should contact the Health Office to report health-related absences if they are unable to attend classes for three or more consecutive days.

The Health Office will notify instructors but is not responsible for missed assignments or lectures and should not take the place of discussing prolonged absences with instructors that may otherwise affect student progress.

Audit of a Course

A grade of T will be given to a student auditing a course. A student may audit a course with the permission of the instructor, but the decision to audit must be declared at the time of registration for the course. Enrollment for students auditing a course begins two weeks before the course starts. The last day for adding an audit course will be the same as that for adding any course for credit. The student may retake such a course for credit in a subsequent semester but may not receive a grade other than T in the semester in which intent to audit has been declared. Any person over 55 years of age can audit a course without paying tuition, though lab or other course fees still apply.

Cancellations

Weather: On days when the weather is bad, College officials will make every effort to announce class cancellations no less than two hours prior to the affected class. Listen to local radio stations for the latest information on closings or visit www.corning-cc.edu.

Instructor absence: When an instructor is absent and the class is cancelled, a notice will be posted in MyCCC, if time permits. Furthermore, the appropriate division secretary will post an official notice of class cancellation using a standardized printed poster. If there is not notice and an instructor does not appear during the first 15 minutes of a class, students may leave.

Insufficient enrollment: If first-week registration in any course is insufficient, the course may be cancelled at the discretion of the Vice President and Dean of Academic Affairs.

Changing Programs

Students who wish to change from one program to another should begin by meeting with their advisor. Forms necessary for recording a change of program are available from advisors, the Enrollment Advisement Center, Advising & Counseling Services, or MyCCC.

Course Shelf Life

It is important that CCC graduates have the most current knowledge and skills required in their field of study. Skills acquired in a course previously taken are subject to course shelf life limitations as stipulated in the course description found in the College catalog. Any course used to meet a program requirement will need to be repeated if its course shelf life has been exceeded. A student repeating a course due to the course shelf life policy will pay full tuition charges for the course. The course will count towards the student’s requirements and enrollment status for determining financial aid eligibility. (Also see Repeat Courses information.)

Transferability of courses from other institutions would follow the same shelf life requirements as approved for CCC courses. Any appeals are to follow the current policy and procedure used for course waivers and substitutions.

Course Waivers/Substitutions

Under special circumstances, program requirements can be waived or other courses substituted for a requirement. Inquiries should be directed to the associate dean of the division administering the course. When necessary, consultation will occur with the associate dean of the division responsible for the program. If a suitable course can be substituted, the associate dean administering the course will make a recommendation to the Vice President and Dean of Academic Affairs for a final decision. Course waiver requests for wellness awareness (HLTH, HEPD, WELL) requirements should be initiated through the Associate Dean of the Social Science/Social Services Division. Course waiver requests for wellness awareness (REPD, PEPD) and wellness activity (PFIT, RECC) requirements should be initiated through the Associate Dean of the Health & Sciences Division. If the course waiver is due to a medical condition, the College Nurse, located in the Health Office, will initiate the waiver. Any waivers for the wellness requirements will then be sent to either the Associate Dean of the Health & Sciences Division or the Associate Dean of the Social Science/Social Services Division.

Course waiver requests for foreign language requirements should be initiated through the Associate Dean of the Communications & Humanities Division. A counselor for students with disabilities will be consulted when a documented disability is the basis for the request. Course waiver/substitution forms may be obtained from your academic advisor. Waivers do not change credit hour requirements needed to graduate.

Credit by Examination

Some students come to CCC already having proficiency in one or more courses. You may obtain credit for these courses by successfully completing the exam (provided the academic divisions have comprehensive examinations available). Your transcript will show the credit earned. No letter grade is given; this credit will not affect your GPA (Grade Point Average). There is no limit to the amount of credit that can be earned in this manner; however, this credit does not apply to the residency requirement. Make arrangements through the appropriate academic division. Credit by examination will not remove D or F grades from your GPA.

Information regarding college credit through other non-traditional means, such as portfolio assessment, is available through Continuing Education.

Dean’s and President’s List

To be eligible for Dean’s List for a given semester, students must meet all the following criteria:

  1. A semester GPA of 3.5 or higher
  2. Twelve or more hours of earned credit (equivalent credit hours are not included)
  3. No grade lower than C
  4. No I or N grades

Part-time students will be considered for Dean’s List in a semester in which they have earned at least 6 credit hours of coursework during the semester in accordance with the above requirements.

To be eligible for President’s List for a given semester, students must meet all the following criteria:

  1. A semester GPA of 3.75 or higher
  2. Twelve or more hours of earned credit (equivalent credit hours are not included)
  3. No grade lower than C
  4. No I or N grades

Part-time students will be considered for President’s List in a semester in which they have earned at least 6 credit hours of coursework during the semester in accordance with the above requirements.

A student who completes an incomplete (I) will be awarded Dean’s or President’s List status retroactively in the semester in which the I was originally assigned, if all other criteria are met.

Developmental Progress Policy

All CCC college-level courses require proficiency in reading, writing, mathematical, verbal or other skills. To help students enroll in courses best suited to their skills, placement testing or assessments are used to determine appropriate courses. When learning needs are identified, students are required to take developmental courses. Developmental courses are credit-equivalent courses, meaning that they count towards the student’s load hours for full-time status and financial aid, but they do not meet program requirements and are not calculated in the Grade Point Average (GPA).

If a learning need is identified in reading, students must register for READ 0800, Introductory Academic Reading or READ 0880, Foundations of College Reading, as determined by the placement test. If placed into READ 0800, upon successful completion of this course, students must then take READ 0880 to satisfy their reading skills requirement. Grading for both courses is A, B, C, F. If a learning need is identified in writing, students must register for ENGL 0950 - Basic Writing Skills or ENGL 0990, Intermediate Writing Skills, as determined by the placement test. Students placed into ENGL 0950 must earn a C or better and also successfully complete ENGL 0990 with a C or better before entering ENGL 1010, College Composition I. Even if a program does not require a credit-bearing English course, students must demonstrate entry-level college writing skills through assessment or by passing ENGL 0990 before they graduate.

If a learning need is identified in mathematics, students must register in MATH 0860 – Basic Math Review or MATH 0960 – Pre-Algebra, as determined by the placement test. Students placed into either course must complete it with a grade of B- or higher.

Upon successful completion of either course, the student will be prepared to take MATH 1015 – Introductory Algebra. Even if a program does not require a credit-bearing Mathematics course, students must demonstrate entry-level college mathematics skills through assessment or by passing MATH 0860 or 0960 before they graduate.

All full- and part-time students placed in one or more developmental classes will also be placed in FYEX 1000 – First Year Experience (3 credit-bearing hours).

Students (new and continuing) placed in any developmental courses will be limited to no more than a 16 hour load until they have successfully passed these developmental courses. Credit and equivalent credit would count toward the 16 hour limit.

Students who are placed in any developmental courses based on an assessed deficiency should enroll in the appropriate course(s), including FYEX 1000, in their first semester. Students who do not successfully complete their developmental course(s) and FYEX 1000 in their first semester must re-register for them in their second semester.

Students who do not complete the required developmental courses and FYEX 1000 in three full-time (or equivalent) semesters cannot register for further study at CCC (developmental dismissal). This action may be challenged by the student by submitting an appeal to the Academic Standards Committee. Once dismissed, the student may be considered for readmission after one year, provided assessment testing determines they have acquired the skills necessary to place out of all developmental courses. For further information regarding this policy, contact Advising & Counseling Services.

Drop/Add

The College realizes that students sometimes need to drop or add courses after classes begin. Once a course begins, it may be added only with the instructor’s permission. Usually courses cannot be added after the first week of classes. To add the class, the student submits an online add request through MyCCC, and asks the instructor directly.

Students who have begun attendance in a course may drop the course without the instructor’s signature. To drop a class the student can submit an online drop form through MyCCC.

Before dropping any course it is strongly recommended that the student:

  1. Discuss the decision with their instructor, advisor, coach, and/or counselor.
  2. Check with the Enrollment Advisement Center to determine any effect on their financial aid. The date the Enrollment Advisement Center is notified of the drop will be the official drop date.

Financial Aid: Check with a representative in the Enrollment Advisement Center before dropping a course. In some cases, course withdrawal can jeopardize eligibility to receive financial aid. Refer to related information under Financial Aid.

Academic Record: A 15-week course dropped in the first three weeks of classes will not appear on the student’s record at all. If dropped in the fourth through the ninth week, the course will appear with a W indicating “withdrawal.” After the ninth week, 15-week courses may not be dropped and final grades will be recorded. All student drops submitted after the official drop date must have the approval of the Vice President and Dean of Academic Affairs. Even after the ninth week, students still have the option of officially withdrawing from the College. (See Withdrawal from College.) For courses meeting fewer than 15 weeks, students have 20% of the length of the course to drop without a record of that course on their transcript, and they have 60% of the length of the course to drop with a W. For clarification of the exact deadline dates, see an Enrollment Advisor.

Drops by Instructor

Faculty members may drop students from their courses for non­-attendance.

Early Alert

Within the first three weeks of each semester, faculty identify students who are showing signs of problems that could result in their being unable to successfully complete the course. The faculty will specify areas of concern (i.e., attendance, preparation, effort, etc.) and report them to Advising & Counseling Services. Students who are identified receive a personal letter informing them of these concerns, along with suggestions for improvement. Contact Advising & Counseling Services for more information.

Fresh Start

Fresh Start provides an opportunity for students who left the College after experiencing academic difficulties to continue their studies with their GPA set to 0.0. Students are eligible for Fresh Start consideration if they meet the following requirements:

  1. Their GPA was below 2.0 when they left the College.
  2. One calendar year has elapsed since their last attendance at CCC.
  3. They have achieved a 2.5 GPA in the first 12 credits earned (excluding developmental and wellness activity courses) upon returning to CCC. If more than 12 credits are earned, then all earned credits (excluding developmental and wellness activity courses) up to and including that semester will be used to calculate GPA.
  4. They have completed all developmental coursework and have no outstanding incompletes.

They must complete and submit an application for a Fresh Start to Advising and Counseling to be forwarded to the Academic Standards Committee of the Faculty Assembly for evaluation.

Students may apply for Fresh Start only once. It cannot be applied to a previous degree. If granted Fresh Start, there may still be implications for financial aid, veteran’s benefits, and transferability. Once granted, Fresh Start may not be rescinded. All course work will remain on the transcript with the notation, “Fresh Start Granted”. No prior course work grades will be used in the calculation of the student’s GPA. Students will receive credit for the courses in which they achieved a C or better so that these credits can be used in program evaluations. Any prior course work in which students have earned a D grade cannot be used to meet degree requirements. Credits for courses in which a C or better has been achieved in work prior to the Fresh Start cannot be used to fulfill residency requirements. Once Fresh Start is granted, the GPA will be calculated with grades received only since the student’s return to the College. For more information or to apply, contact Advising & Counseling Services.

General Education Requirement (SUNY)

The State University of New York (SUNY) requires that programs leading to an A.A. or A.S. degree allow students to complete seven out of ten SUNY General Education Requirements (including Mathematics and Basic Communication) and 30 credits of SUNY General Education courses. The Engineering Science program is waived from the requirement. Other programs might be waived as well. The ten SUNY General Education Requirements are Mathematics, Natural Science, Social Science, American History, Western Civilization, Other World Civilizations, Humanities, Arts, Foreign Languages and Basic Communication. Once certified as meeting these General Education Requirements with a grade of C or better at CCC, students will not be required to complete them again upon transfer to any baccalaureate-granting SUNY college or university. Each course that has been approved as meeting the general education criteria is identified in the course description. When students meet with their advisors, they should ask about general education requirements in their transfer program.

Grades

Grades, as follow, will be issued at the end of each semester.

Grade Points Achievement in Subject
A
A-
4.0
3.7
Comprehensive knowledge, understanding; marked perception, originality.
B+
B
B-
3.3
3.0
2.7
Moderately broad knowledge, understanding; noticeable perception, originality.
C+
C
2.3
2.0
Reasonable knowledge, understanding; some perception, originality.
D 1.0 Minimum knowledge, understanding; limited perception, originality.
F 0.0 Unacceptable knowledge, understanding; failing work.

The following grades and administrative notations are not used to determine grade point average:

H Honors work. Appears next to course.
I Incomplete. May be assigned at the discretion of the instructor in special circumstances in which course requirements have not been completed by a student who has clearly demonstrated potential for successfully completing the course. A written statement of requirements for completing the course must be given to the student by the faculty member. Credit hours and grade points are not assigned for an I grade. When the requirements have been completed, the faculty member will submit a grade change from the I to another letter grade. Course requirements for the I grades must be completed within one calendar year; however, the instructor has the prerogative of establishing an earlier deadline.
N No grade/no credit.
P Passing work at a C level or higher.
R Official withdrawal from College.
S Satisfactory. For courses not counted for degree credit.
T Audit.
U Unsatisfactory. For courses not counted for degree credit.
W Official withdrawal from course.

Grade Point Average (GPA)

To determine a grade point average (GPA), divide the total number of grade points earned by the number of credit hours taken.

Example:

ENGL 1020 3 cr. hr. A (4.0 pts.) = 12.0
HIST 1110 3 cr. hr. C+ (2.3 pts.) = 21.9
MATH 1000 1 cr. hr. P (no value) = 0.0
MATH 1110 3 cr. hr. F (0.0 pts) = 0.0
RECC 1010 1 cr. hr. B (3.0 pts.) = 3.0
  11 cr. hr. total pts   = 21.9
  10 credits have point value    

Dividing 21.9 points by 10 credits equals 2.19 GPA.

Grade Point Average (GPA): For each credit hour, points are assigned based on the grade received. This average is calculated by dividing the total grade points earned by the number of credit hours taken. For repeated courses, the most recent grade is used in the calculation. For students granted Fresh Start status, only grades earned upon return to CCC will be calculated in the GPA. Developmental courses and transfer credits are not calculated in the GPA.

Program Grade Point Average (PGPA): Each graduating student must earn a minimum 2.0 PGPA. The PGPA will be determined by calculating the grade point average of the courses used to fulfill the program requirements as outlined in the College catalog and based on only those courses used to meet program and degree requirements, including program electives and free electives. For repeated courses, the highest grade will be used in the calculation. Transfer credits are not calculated in the PGPA.

Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA): The CGPA is used to determine financial aid eligibility. The CGPA is determined by calculating the grades of all credit-bearing courses that a student has taken, including all grades for repeated courses. Transfer credits are not calculated into the CGPA. See the section entitled Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) in the Financial Aid portion of the catalog.

Grading Practices

If at any time you disagree with your instructor over a final grade, make an appointment with the instructor so that you can discuss the reason for your grade. You are entitled to know the basis upon which you are graded.

If you are not satisfied with the resolution of the grading problem after talking with your instructor, you have the right to discuss the matter with the division’s associate dean. If you are still not satisfied with the resolution of the grading problem, the final appeal rests with the Vice President and Dean of Academic Affairs.

Time Limit for Grade Change: A student has the right to challenge a final grade given by a faculty member within one year of the awarding of the grade. Only the faculty member who awarded a grade can authorize a change, with the approval of the division’s associate dean. If a faculty member is unavailable, you can discuss this matter with the appropriate associate dean. After the one-year time limit has passed, all grade changes must be requested by submitting an academic appeal to the Academic Standards Committee (see Academic Appeals for process information).

Graduation Application and Review

A full semester before intended graduation, students should submit a degree application to the Enrollment Advisement Center. Their academic record will then be reviewed to determine that all degree requirements are met.

Graduation Requirements

Each graduating student must:

  • Complete all of the requirements for the program as described in the catalog; and,
  • Complete a minimum of 60 semester credit hours for degrees and the minimum required semester credit hours for certificates, excluding credit used to meet the wellness requirement (some programs require more than 60 credit hours); and,
  • Complete the wellness requirement, and,
  • Earn a minimum 2.0 PGPA, and,
  • Meet the College’s Residency requirement of 30 program credit hours for degrees and 15 program credit hours for certificates.

It is the student’s responsibility to make certain that all requirements for graduation have been met. Students have the right to come under the regulations published in the catalog in effect during the first semester of their matriculation at CCC or, if they choose, a catalog published after they have matriculated at CCC. Graduation honors: Pennon bearers are the graduates attending the graduation ceremony with the highest Grade Point Average (GPA) in each degree. In order to be graduated summa cum laude, students must have a GPA of 4.0; cum laude requires a GPA of at least 3.5. To be eligible for program honors, graduates must have a Program Grade Point Average (PGPA) of at least 3.5. The award will be presented to the graduate with the highest PGPA in each program. In order to wear the Phi Theta Kappa gold stole at commencement, students must have completed all graduation requirements with a GPA of 3.5 or higher. Any student within six credit hours of completion of the degree or certificate and who has a minimum PGPA of 2.0 at the time of commencement will be allowed to participate in commencement exercises. The degree or certificate will be conferred and the diploma will be issued in August, January or May following completion of all requirements.

Independent Study

These courses are supervised by instructors with permission of the appropriate associate dean. Interested students should contact the instructor to find out if an independent study in a given subject area is possible. Once approved by the instructor and the associate dean, the student adds for the course through MyCCC.

Late Registration

See Drop/Add

Multiple Programs

Students may be permitted to earn more than one degree or complete the requirements for more than one program. You can initiate that action by meeting with the associate dean responsible for the new program. A degree can be awarded only once, but more than one program can be earned within any degree. Students should consult with financial aid before pursuing multiple programs.

The requirements for earning multiple programs are:

  • All of the requirements for each program must be met.
  • At least 15 additional credit hours must be earned for each additional program, at least nine of which have been earned in residence at CCC.

Pass/No Grade-No Credit Option

Students who have been named to the President’s List or Dean’s List may enroll the next semester in any one free elective course under the pass/no grade option. This course will not affect the GPA, and it will be noted as pass/no grade on the transcript. When choosing this option, students must notify the Enrollment Advisement Center within two weeks of the beginning of the course in a 15-week semester (or equivalent). If, by the end of the 13th week (or equivalent), students wish to receive a standard grade, they may do so by notifying the Enrollment Advisement Center. Students can continue to use this option as long as they remain on the President’s List or Dean’s List. This option will be used for free electives only; however, if a student subsequently changes programs, courses with the P grade, already taken, can fulfill the new program’s requirement.

NOTE: Veterans studying under the G.I. Bill are cautioned to avoid using the pass/no grade option. They need to carry 12 credit hours for which letter grades are awarded or they may jeopardize their benefits.

Registration

In order for a student to receive credit in a course, the student must be properly registered for that course. Enrollment in a course is not official until proper registration materials have been filed with the Enrollment Advisement Center.

Blocks to registration: Further registration in courses may not be permitted until outstanding requirements are met. Examples of reasons for students’ registrations being blocked are not satisfying the College’s academic, developmental, health and financial requirements.

It is a general College practice that when credit has been received for a course which requires a prerequisite, credit may not later be received for the prerequisite course or its equivalent, unless previously approved by the appropriate associate dean.

Online Registration: Most continuing students in good academic standing will be permitted to register online during open registration periods. Students who meet with an academic advisor will be permitted to register prior to open registration. First-time full-time students, students with pending developmental requirements, students on probation, and students who are not in good academic standing are strongly encouraged to consult with an advisor before registering for courses. Student-initiated online registration will be blocked for courses requiring instructor consent and courses for which prerequisites have not been met.

Repeat Courses

A student may repeat a course or take an equivalent course for a letter grade. For any repeated course the original grade together with the repeat grade will be recorded on the student’s transcripts but only the most recent grade, even if it is lower than the original grade, will be used to compute the GPA. If, however the student repeats the course due to an expired shelf life, then the new grade will be used in the calculation of the student’s PGPA.

Students should note: because the most recent grade is used, if they repeat a course and earn a lower grade, their GPA will go down. Likewise, if they fail the course or earn a grade that does not fulfill the requirement, they risk having to take the course once again.

The TAP award will count repeat courses toward full-time attendance if a student earns a D or higher in a course with shelf life or a course required to continue in a program. However, if a student repeats a course in which he/she earns a D or higher and the course does not have a shelf life or the shelf life has not expired, the student must have 12 or more hours of other courses to be considered a full-time student for TAP.

For questions about repeat courses, contact Advising & Counseling Services.

Residency Requirement

Students pursuing an associate degree must complete a minimum of 30 program hours of credit for a degree at CCC. For certificate students, 50% of the program hours of credit must be completed at CCC.

Retention and Graduation

The percentages of full-time students who entered the college for the first time in Fall 2008 and who graduated or were still enrolled at CCC after initial enrollment are as follows (as of Fall 2011):

  • Overall Graduation Rate: 28%
  • Transfer-out Rate: 8%
  • First-time, full-time Retention Rate: 55%
  • First-time, part-time Retention Rate: 36%

A number of students transfer to other colleges and universities before graduating from CCC. They are not included in these graduation and retention figures.

More detailed information on student outcomes is available from the Institutional Research Office.

Schedule Changes

See Drop/Add

Schedule Limits and Course Loads

The minimum full-time load is 12 load hours, usually four courses. An average load is 15 credit hours. If you take fewer than 12 load hours a semester, you are a part-time student. Permission from the Vice President and Dean of Academic Affairs is required to take more than 19 hours.

Most students at CCC hold jobs in the community while attending school. Many work part-time hours, others a full 40 hours a week. Frequently these same students have family responsibilities. School, work and home activities all require time and energy. It is important for a student to balance school and study commitments with work and family obligations in order to be successful in all three areas. Students who plan to work while taking classes should talk with their academic advisor or a College counselor to realistically plan how much time can be committed to college studies, work obligations and home responsibilities.

Most associate degree programs require 62-72 credit hours of course work. In order to graduate in two years a student should plan to take 15-18 hours per semester. Each hour of work in class can be expected to require at least two hours of study outside of class. Students with no outside employment or other major responsibilities can generally carry a full-time load. If a student intends to work more than 15 hours a week, the College recommends that the student reduce academic load and plan to take more than two years to complete a degree.

Recommended levels of work and study are as follows:

  • If you work 1 to 10 hours per week, CCC recommends you schedule 13-16 credit hours.
  • If you work 11 to 20 hours per week, CCC recommends you schedule 9-13 credit hours.
  • If you work 21 to 30 hours per week, CCC recommends you schedule 6-9 credit hours.
  • If you work 31 to 40 hours per week, CCC recommends you schedule 3-6 credit hours.

Student Progress Policy

See Academic Progress Policy

Transcript of Courses

An official academic record listing courses and grades for each student each semester is kept in the Enrollment Advisement Center. Requests for an official transcript should be addressed to that office. Students can access their unofficial transcript through their MyCCC account. Any student who has not satisfied obligations to the College may have the transcript of record withheld until such obligation is satisfied.

Warning Grades

At mid-semester, students with D or F averages in any course will be notified of their standing. This grade is only to encourage those students to get help in the course and is not an additional grade on their records. Students who get a warning grade should go immediately to their instructor or advisor to discuss what to do about it. Tutoring help, study skills help, or seeing a counselor for assistance are possible solutions. Contact Advising & Counseling Services for further information.

Wellness Requirement

All degree programs have a 2 credit wellness requirement. Students must complete 1 credit of wellness activity and 1 credit of wellness awareness. Courses that qualify for the wellness activity component have a PFIT or RECC prefix. Courses that qualify for wellness awareness have a WELL, HLTH, HEPD, PEPD or REPD prefix. RECC 1400 - Wilderness First Responder meets both the activity and awareness requirements. Students with military training may receive transfer credit towards the wellness requirement (1 activity credit and 1 awareness credit) by submitting an official military transcript or a DD214 that reflects completion of basic training.

Alternate methods for satisfying wellness requirement:

Proficiency Exams: These are arranged by appointment with the appropriate faculty.

Assessment for Prior Learning: Arrangements for review of documentation for current CPR can be completed through the Associate Dean for Social Science/Social Service Division.

Waiver/Substitution: See “Course Waivers/Substitutions”

Withdrawal from College

Official withdrawal from the College is possible any time prior to the start of final exam week. Obtain withdrawal information from the Enrollment Advisement Center, an advisor, a counselor or Advising & Counseling Services. An exit interview with a counselor should be arranged at Advising & Counseling Services.

To officially withdraw from College, notify the Enrollment Advisement Center. The date that the Enrollment Advisement Center is notified is the official withdraw date. To notify EAC, the student can submit an online drop request through their MyCCC account for each registered course.

Before withdrawing it is strongly recommended that the student discuss the decision with their instructor, advisor, coach, and/or counselor and check with the Enrollment Advisement Center to determine any effect on their financial aid, bill, or academic record.

A grade of R may be placed on the record for each course being taken at the time of withdrawal. If there are any outstanding obligations, your academic records will be held until they are satisfactorily fulfilled; until that time no transcript requests will be processed.

Withdrawal from Courses

See Drop/Add

Writing-Process and Writing-in-Content-Areas Courses

To uphold its commitment to the continuing development of students’ skills in written communication, CCC has designated courses as Writ­ing-Process (WP) or Writing-in-Content-Areas (WCA) if those courses meet the following criteria:

Writing-Process (WP)

At least 60 percent of a student’s final grade must be determined from structured writing assignments: essays, research projects, technical and laboratory reports, etc. The assignments are designed to develop, reflect and reinforce writing expertise appropriate to college-level learning and thinking required in a particular discipline.

Structured writing assignments must total at least 3,000 words throughout a semester.

All structured assignments are read and evaluated by the classroom instructor. Assignments are graded not solely on content, but also on aspects of writing skills: focus, structure, development, standard written English, etc. Assignments emphasize writing process, including planning, shaping, drafting, revising, proofreading and editing. A specific revision policy for enhancing and honing student writing skills is provided.

Classroom time is devoted to topics directly related to writing in the discipline.

Writing-in-Content-Areas (WCA)

Thirty to 100 percent of a student’s final grade must be determined by writing: essays, essay examinations, technical and laboratory reports, observation reports, journals, concept illustrations (tie-ins), etc. The assignments are designed to evaluate, apply, reflect and reinforce course concepts.

The writing should be appropriate to college-level learning and thinking required in a particular discipline.

Structured writing assignments must total at least 1,500 words throughout a semester.

All structured assignments are read and evaluated by the classroom instructor. Assignments are graded mostly on content, coherence and standard written English.